Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Some Facts Randomly Searched

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Taken from http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~bingbin/

 

If you have 3 quarters, 4 dimes, and 4 pennies, you have $1.19. You also have the largest amount of money in coins without being able to make change for a dollar.

The numbers '172' can be found on the back of the U.S. $5 dollar bill in the bushes at the base of the Lincoln Memorial.

President Kennedy was the fastest random speaker in the world with upwards of 350 words per minute.

In the average lifetime, a person will walk the equivalent of 5 times around the equator.

Odontophobia is the fear of teeth.

The 57 on Heinz ketchup bottles represents the number of varieties of pickles the company once had.

In the early days of the telephone, operators would pick up a call and use the phrase, "Well, are you there?". It wasn't until 1895 that someone suggested answering the phone with the phrase "number please?"

The surface area of an average-sized brick is 79 cm squared.

According to suicide statistics, Monday is the favored day for self-destruction.

Cats sleep 16 to 18 hours per day.

The most common name in the world is Mohammed.

It is believed that Shakespeare was 46 around the time that the King James Version of the Bible was written. In Psalms 46, the 46th word from the first word is shake and the 46th word from the last word is spear.

Karoke means "empty orchestra" in Japanese.

The Eisenhower interstate system requires that one mile in every five must be straight. These straight sections are usable as airstrips in times of war or other emergencies.

The first known contraceptive was crocodile dung, used by Egyptians in 2000 B.C.

Rhode Island is the smallest state with the longest name. The official name, used on all state documents, is "Rhode Island and Providence Plantations."

When you die your hair still grows for a couple of months.

There are two credit cards for every person in the United States.

Isaac Asimov is the only author to have a book in every Dewey-decimal category.

The newspaper serving Frostbite Falls, Minnesota, the home of Rocky and Bullwinkle, is the Picayune Intellegence.

It would take 11 Empire State Buildings, stacked one on top of the other, to measure the Gulf of Mexico at its deepest point.

The first person selected as the Time Magazine Man of the Year - Charles Lindbergh in 1927.

The most money ever paid for a cow in an auction was $1.3 million.

It took Leo Tolstoy six years to write "War & Peace".

The Neanderthal's brain was bigger than yours is.

On the new hundred dollar bill the time on the clock tower of Independence Hall is 4:10.

Each of the suits on a deck of cards represents the four major pillars of the economy in the middle ages: heart represented the Church, spades represented the military, clubs represented agriculture, and diamonds represented the merchant class.

The names of the two stone lions in front of the New York Public Library are Patience and Fortitude. They were named by then-mayor Fiorello LaGuardia.

The Main Library at Indiana University sinks over an inch every year because when it was built, engineers failed to take into account the weight of all the books that would occupy the building.

The sound of E.T. walking was made by someone squishing her hands in jelly.

Lucy and Linus (who where brother and sister) had another little brother named Rerun. (He sometimes played left-field on Charlie Brown's baseball team, [when he could find it!]).

The pancreas produces Insulin.

1 in 5,000 north Atlantic lobsters are born bright blue.

There are 10 human body parts that are only 3 letters long (eye hip arm leg ear toe jaw rib lip gum).

A skunk's smell can be detected by a human a mile away.

The word "lethologica" describes the state of not being able to remember the word you want.

The king of hearts is the only king without a moustache.

Henry Ford produced the model T only in black because the black paint available at the time was the fastest to dry.

Mario, of Super Mario Bros. fame, appeared in the 1981 arcade game, Donkey Kong. His original name was Jumpman, but was changed to Mario to honor the Nintendo of America's landlord, Mario Segali.

The three best-known western names in China: Jesus Christ, Richard Nixon, and Elvis Presley.

Every year about 98% of the atoms in your body are replaced.

Elephants are the only mammals that can't jump.

The international telephone dialing code for Antarctica is 672.

World Tourist day is observed on September 27.

Women are 37% more likely to go to a psychiatrist than men are.

The human heart creates enough pressure to squirt blood 30 feet (9 m).

Diet Coke was only invented in 1982.

There are more than 1,700 references to gems and precious stones in the King James translation of the Bible.

When snakes are born with two heads, they fight each other for food.

American car horns beep in the tone of F.

Turning a clock's hands counterclockwise while setting it is not necessarily harmful. It is only damaging when the timepiece contains a chiming mechanism.

There are twice as many kangaroos in Australia as there are people. The kangaroo population is estimated at about 40 million.

Police dogs are trained to react to commands in a foreign language; commonly German but more recently Hungarian.

The Australian $5 to $100 notes are made of plastic.

St. Stephen is the patron saint of bricklayers.

The average person makes about 1,140 telephone calls each year.

Stressed is Desserts spelled backwards.

If you had enough water to fill one million goldfish bowls, you could fill an entire stadium.

Mary Stuart became Queen of Scotland when she was only six days old.

Charlie Brown's father was a barber.

Flying from London to New York by Concord, due to the time zones crossed, you can arrive 2 hours before you leave.

Dentists have recommended that a toothbrush be kept at least 6 feet (2 m) away from a toilet to avoid airborne particles resulting from the flush.

You burn more calories sleeping than you do watching TV.

A lion's roar can be heard from five miles away.

The citrus soda 7-UP was created in 1929; "7" was selected because the original containers were 7 ounces. "UP" indicated the direction of the bubbles.

Canadian researchers have found that Einstein's brain was 15% wider than normal.

The average person spends about 2 years on the phone in a lifetime.

The fist product to have a bar code was Wrigleys gum.

The largest number of children born to one woman is recorded at 69. From 1725-1765, a Russian peasant woman gave birth to 16 sets of twins, 7 sets of triplets, and 4 sets of quadruplets.

Beatrix Potter created the first of her legendary "Peter Rabbit" children's stories in 1902.

In ancient Rome, it was considered a sign of leadership to be born with a crooked nose.

The word "nerd" was first coined by Dr. Seuss in "If I Ran the Zoo."

A 41-gun salute is the traditional salute to a royal birth in Great Britain.

The bagpipe was originally made from the whole skin of a dead sheep.

The roar that we hear when we place a seashell next to our ear is not the ocean, but rather the sound of blood surging through the veins in the ear. Any cup-shaped object placed over the ear produces the same effect.

Revolvers cannot be silenced because of all the noisy gasses which escape the cylinder gap at the rear of the barrel.

Liberace Museum has a mirror-plated Rolls Royce; jewel-encrusted capes, and the largest rhinestone in the world, weighing 59 pounds and almost a foot in diameter.

A car that shifts manually gets 2 miles more per gallon of gas than a car with automatic shift.

Cats can hear ultrasound.

Dueling is legal in Paraguay as long as both parties are registered blood donors.

The highest point in Pennsylvania is lower than the lowest point in Colorado.

The United States has never lost a war in which mules were used.

Children grow faster in the springtime.

On average, there are 178 sesame seeds on each McDonalds BigMac bun.

Paul Revere rode on a horse that belonged to Deacon Larkin.

The Baby Ruth candy bar was actually named after Grover Cleveland's baby daughter, Ruth.

Minus 40 degrees Celsius is exactly the same as minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Clans of long ago that wanted to get rid of unwanted people without killing them used to burn their houses down -- hence the expression "to get fired"

Nobody knows who built the Taj Mahal. The names of the architects, masons, and designers that have come down to us have all proved to be latter-day inventions, and there is no evidence to indicate who the real creators were.

Every human spent about half an hour as a single cell.

7.5 million toothpicks can be created from a cord of wood.

The plastic things on the end of shoelaces are called aglets.

A 41-gun salute is the traditional salute to a royal birth in Great Britain.

The earliest recorded case of a man giving up smoking was on April 5, 1679, when Johan Katsu, Sheriff of Turku, Finland, wrote in his diary "I quit smoking tobacco." He died one month later.

"Goodbye" came from "God bye" which came from "God be with you."

February is Black History Month.

Jane Barbie was the woman who did the voice recordings for the Bell System.

The first drive-in service station in the United States was opened by Gulf Oil Company - on December 1, 1913, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The elephant is the only animal with 4 knees.

Kansas state law requires pedestrians crossing the highways at night to wear tail lights.

Sunday, November 7, 2010

Monthly Geeky Newsletter Wrath-up #1 - November 2010

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Facebook meet with members of the mobile industry




While expectation was building before the date by around of November 5 as it was strongly suggested that Facebook might be announcing that they were venturing to the mobile war to compete with Apple (iPhone), Research In Motion (BlackBerry) and Google (Android OS). But as a unpleasant surprise, Facebook's own Mark Zuckerberg has denied this rumor. The event just was a platform for formal announcing of  big changes for the mobile world of Facebook.

  • Many things are coming for DEALS and PLACES, and a point merging both in some point as a Foursquare formula. Talking about Foursquare, it is strongly rumored that Facebook is preparing PLACES for a compability with Foursquare and Gowalla support. (Good Move, since personally I think PLACES suck so hard!).
  • Single Sign-On: Practically expanding the already spread-everywhere "Login With Facebook"  as a universal access for user and developerss alike.
  • New API for FACEBOOK PLACES.

Research In Motion announces the compability of BES to Lotus Domino




Lotus Domino is well known in the business world for handling corporate internal messaging. 


RIM Announces Free BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express Software for IBM Lotus Domino

Wirelessly Synchronizes BlackBerry Smartphones with Lotus Email, Calendar, Contacts and More; Works with Business and Personal Data Plans
Waterloo, ON. – Research In Motion (RIM) (NASDAQ: RIMM, TSX: RIM) announced today BlackBerry® Enterprise Server Express for IBM Lotus Domino – free server software that wirelessly synchronizes email, calendar, contacts, notes and tasks between BlackBerry® smartphones and IBM Lotus Domino without compromising security. The software is available today here.
BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express uses the same robust security architecture of the market-leading, premium BlackBerry® Enterprise Server, and includes more than 75 of the over 500 smartphone controls and IT security policies available with the premium version of BlackBerry Enterprise Server software. It supports BlackBerry smartphones on business data plans as well as most personal data plans*.
“BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express is a free download that is designed for businesses of all sizes. It provides an easy way for businesses to get started using BlackBerry smartphones with IBM Lotus Domino and it’s also an ideal no-cost software solution for businesses that want to allow their employees to connect their personal BlackBerry smartphones to their work email,” said Jeff McDowell, Senior Vice President, Enterprise and Platform Marketing at Research In Motion.
“There’s tremendous growth in work force mobility, from small businesses through to major corporations, and there is clear evidence that shows how smartphones can increase organizational responsiveness, improve productivity and help employees make the most of their time,” said Ed Brill, Director, Messaging and Collaboration, IBM Software Group. “BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express is a great opportunity for businesses to cost-effectively extend Lotus Domino to more employees on BlackBerry smartphones.”
With BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express connected to IBM Lotus Domino, BlackBerry smartphone users will be able to:
  • Wirelessly synchronize email, calendar, contacts, notes and tasks
  • Manage email folders and search email on the mail server from their smartphones
  • Book meetings and appointments, accept meeting requests, check availability and forward calendar attachments
  • Set an out-of-office reply
  • Access files stored on the company network
  • Use mobile applications to access business systems behind the firewall
For IT administrators, BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express includes:
  • A Web-based interface that allows remote administration and makes it easy to deploy applications over the air, connect and manage BlackBerry smartphones, and apply usage policies
  • Over 75 IT controls and policies, including the ability to remotely wipe a smartphone and enforce and reset passwords
  • Employee self-service tools for securing a lost or stolen device
  • BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express works with Domino Enterprise Server and Domino Messaging Server. It can support multiple Lotus Domino domain environments from a single Web-based administration interface and can be run in parallel with the premium BlackBerry Enterprise Server software for the same instance of IBM Lotus Domino.
Software, the BlackBerry® Clients for IBM Lotus Sametime, Lotus Connections, and Lotus Quickr, and other enterprise-grade systems. The premium BlackBerry Enterprise Server is ideal for managing company-issued BlackBerry smartphones, whereas the free BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express is an ideal option for securely connecting employee-owned BlackBerry smartphones to the corporate network without adding software licensing costs to the company.The premium version of BlackBerry Enterprise Server for IBM Lotus Domino provides more extensive mobile device management capabilities, over 500 smartphone controls and IT security policies for more granular control, and is required for add-on solutions such as BlackBerry® Mobile Voice System, Chalk Pushcast
BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express for Lotus Domino is available today in seven languages, including English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Japanese and Brazilian.

Dell Switching BlackBerry for their new Smartphone with Windows 7 Phone
(from BlackBerryPR)
In a dramatic move, Dell has announced that starting next week will move to the 25,000 employees using BlackBerry's new smartphone on Dell Venue Pro .
Apparently, the company takes some time to organize this movement with Microsoft in what it hopes will save 25% on their communication costs by assigning it to the cost of servers / RIM licensing.

After this move, Dell expects to begin an aggressive media campaign.
Clearly in this decision We Are Competing with RIM, Them Because We're kicking out. - - Said in an interview with Brian Gladden, Dell CFO.
But the most curious of all is that the company expects to raise an eBay site where they will be selling these previously used BlackBerry's employees.
We Actually Had a conversation last night around Creating a site on eBay We Can Actually WHERE These sell BlackBerry devices.
It is certainly an unexpected move, especially when the new operating system Windows Phone 7 is aimed at the consumer and not the company. So if you are looking for a BlackBerry at a good price, check out the eBay store Dell.


Possibles Specs for BlackBerry Storm 3
 Colleagues from BBLeaks have collected information of what could include the BlackBerry Storm 3.
Possible specifications are:
  1. Possibly a 5MP or 8MP camera.
  2. Possibly include a MicroSD card of 8GB or 16GB and 32GB explandible.
  3. 1GB RAM.
  4. Optical trackpad.
  5. 3G
  6. WI-FI.
  7. GPS.
  8. 1200 mAh battery.
Still to be seen whether the device will be launched with 4G capacity and if indeed it would be the first device with BlackBerry QNX OS (BlackBerry 7).


Notes from Google TV



  • Big upset for Google TV as the big 3 of TVs, ABC, CBS and NBC have declined on being part of Google TV services. Apparently the unattractiveness of the business framework presented to the networks was the big reason for them back off from Google's newest venture on television to compete directly with Apple TV which it is also facing the same problem. Meanwhile HBO and Turner company have agreed to optimized their network for be Google TV enabled.
  • Twitter announced support for the Google TV services as the mayor of things that can be done on the web in a normal computer can be done in a TV like replying, RT, etc.



Friday, November 5, 2010

“I Will Never Know Why”– by Susan Klebold

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On April 1999, Two student, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold embarks one of the most deadliest shooting in School property in the United States. At the tenth anniversary and after almost 10 years of public declaration petitions denied, Susan Klebod decided to break the silence and share her experiences, though and view of the events and the aftermath. The open letter was published by Oprah at October 2009.

Dylan&Eric

“I Will Never Know Why”

by Susan Klebold

200911-omag-klebold-220x312Susan & Dylan during his 5th birthday (taken from Oprah.com)

Just after noon on Tuesday, April 20, 1999, I was preparing to leave my downtown Denver office for a meeting when I noticed the red message light flashing on my phone. I worked for the state of Colorado, administering training programs for people with disabilities; my meeting was about student scholarships, and I figured the message might be a last-minute cancellation. But it was my husband, calling from his home office. His voice was breathless and ragged, and his words stopped my heart. "Susan—this is an emergency! Call me back immediately!"


The level of pain in his voice could mean only one thing: Something had happened to one of our sons. In the seconds that passed as I picked up the phone and dialed our house, panic swelled within me; it felt as though millions of tiny needles were pricking my skin. My heart pounded in my ears. My hands began shaking. I tried to orient myself. One of my boys was at school and the other was at work. It was the lunch hour. Had there been a car accident?
When my husband picked up the phone, he shouted, "Listen to the television!"—then held out the receiver so I could hear. I couldn't understand the words being broadcast, but the fact that whatever had happened was big enough to be on TV filled me with terror. Were we at war? Was our country under nuclear attack? "What's happening?" I shrieked.


He came back on the line and poured out what he'd just learned during a distraught call from a close friend of our 17-year-old son, Dylan: There was some kind of shooting at the high school…gunmen in black trenchcoats were firing at people…the friend knew all the kids who wore trenchcoats, and all were accounted for except Dylan and his friend Eric…and Dylan and Eric hadn't been in class that morning…and no one knew where they were.
My husband had told himself that if he found the coat, Dylan couldn't be involved. He'd torn the house apart, looking everywhere. No coat. When there was nowhere left to look, somehow he knew the truth. It was like staring at one of those computer-generated 3-D pictures when the abstract pattern suddenly comes into focus as a recognizable image.


I barely got enough air in my lungs to say, "I'm coming home." We hung up without saying goodbye.


My office was 26 miles from our house. All I could think as I drove was that Dylan was in danger. With every cell in my body, I felt his importance to me, and I knew I would never recover if anything happened to him. I seesawed between impossible possibilities, all of them sending me into paroxysms of fear. Maybe no one knew where Dylan was because he'd been shot himself. Maybe he was lying in the school somewhere injured or dead. Maybe he was being held hostage. Maybe he was trapped and couldn't get word to us. Maybe it was some kind of prank and no one was hurt. How could we think for even a second that Dylan could shoot someone? Shame on us for even considering the idea. Dylan was a gentle, sensible kid. No one in our family had ever owned a gun. How in the world could he be part of something like this?

Yet no matter how hard I wanted to believe that he wasn't, I couldn't dismiss the possibility. My husband had noticed something tight in Dylan's voice earlier that week; I had heard it myself just that morning. I knew that Dylan disliked his school. And that he'd spent much of the past few days with Eric Harris—who hadn't been to our house for months but who'd suddenly stayed over one night that weekend. If Eric was missing now, too, then I couldn't deny that the two of them might be involved in something bad together. More than a year earlier, they had broken into a van parked on a country road near our house. They'd been arrested and had completed a juvenile diversion program that involved counseling, community service, and classes. Their theft had shown that under each other's influence they could be impulsive and unscrupulous. Could they also—no matter how unbelievable it seemed—be violent?


When I got home my husband told me the police were on their way. I had so much adrenaline in my system that even as I was changing out of my work clothes, I was racing from room to room. I felt such an urgency to be ready for whatever might happen next. I called my sister. As I told her what was going on, I was overcome by horror, and I started to cry. Moments after I hung up the phone, my 20-year-old son walked in and lifted me like a rag doll in his arms while I sobbed into a dish towel. Then my husband shouted from the front hallway, "They're here!"


Members of a SWAT team in dark uniforms with bulletproof vests had arrived. I thought they were coming to help us or to get our assistance in helping Dylan; if Dylan did have a gun, maybe they were hoping we could persuade him to put it down. But it seemed that in the SWAT team's eyes, we were suspects ourselves. Years later I would learn that many of their actions that day were intended to protect us; fearing that we would hurt ourselves or that our home might have been rigged with explosives, they told us we had to leave the house. For the rest of the afternoon, we stayed outside, sitting on the sidewalk or pacing up and down our brick walk. When we needed to use the bathroom, two armed guards escorted us inside and waited by the door.
I do not remember how or when, but sometime that day it was confirmed that Dylan and Eric were indeed perpetrators in a massacre at the school. I was in shock and barely grasped what was happening, but I could hear the television through the open windows. News coverage announced a growing tally of victims. Helicopters began circling overhead to capture a killer's family on film. Cars lined the road and onlookers gawked to get a better view.


Though others were suffering, my thoughts focused on the safety of my own child. With every moment that passed, the likelihood of seeing Dylan as I knew him diminished. I asked the police over and over, "What's happening? Where's Dylan? Is he okay?" Late in the afternoon someone finally told me that he was dead but not how he died. We were told to evacuate for a few days so authorities could search our home; we found shelter in the basement of a family member's house. After a sleepless night, I learned that Dylan and Eric had killed 12 students and one teacher, and injured 24 others, before taking their own lives.

As a young child, Dylan made parenting easy. From the time he was a toddler, he had a remarkable attention span and sense of order. He spent hours focused on puzzles and interlocking toys. He loved origami and Legos. By third grade, when he entered a gifted program at school, he had become his father's most devoted chess partner. He and his brother acted out feats of heroism in our backyard. He played Little League baseball. No matter what he did, he was driven to win—and was very hard on himself when he lost.


His adolescence was less joyful than his childhood. As he grew, he became extremely shy and uncomfortable when he was the center of attention, and would hide or act silly if we tried to take his picture. By junior high, it was evident that he no longer liked school; worse, his passion for learning was gone. In high school, he held a job and participated as a sound technician in school productions, but his grades were only fair. He hung out with friends, slept late when he could, spent time in his room, talked on the phone, and played video games on a computer he built. In his junior year, he stunned us by hacking into the school's computer system with a friend (a violation for which he was expelled), but the low point of that year was his arrest. After the arrest, we kept him away from Eric for several weeks, and as time passed he seemed to distance himself from Eric of his own accord. I took this as a good sign.


By Dylan's senior year, he had grown tall and thin. His hair was long and scraggly; under his baseball cap, it stuck out like a clown wig. He'd been accepted at four colleges and had decided to go to the University of Arizona, but he'd never regained his love of learning. He was quiet. He grew irritated when we critiqued his driving, asked him to help around the house, or suggested that he get a haircut. In the last few months of senior year, he was pensive, as if he were thinking about the challenges of growing older. One day in April I said, "You seem so quiet lately—are you okay?" He said he was "just tired." Another time I asked if he wanted to talk about going away to college. I told him that if he didn't feel ready, he could stay home and go to a community college. He said, "I definitely want to go away." If that was a reference to anything more than leaving home for college, it never occurred to me.


Early on April 20, I was getting dressed for work when I heard Dylan bound down the stairs and open the front door. Wondering why he was in such a hurry when he could have slept another 20 minutes, I poked my head out of the bedroom. "Dyl?" All he said was "Bye." The front door slammed, and his car sped down the driveway. His voice had sounded sharp. I figured he was mad because he'd had to get up early to give someone a lift to class. I had no idea that I had just heard his voice for the last time.

It took about six months for the sheriff's department to begin sharing some of the evidence explaining what happened that day. For those six months, Dylan's friends and family were in denial. We didn't know that he and Eric had assembled an arsenal of explosives and guns. We believed his participation in the massacre was accidental or that he had been coerced. We believed that he did not intend to hurt anyone. One friend was sure that Dylan had been tricked at the last minute into using live ammunition. None of us could accept that he was capable of doing what he did.


These thoughts may seem foolish in light of what we now know, but they reflect what we believed to be true about Dylan. Yes, he had filled notebook pages with his private thoughts and feelings, repeatedly expressing profound alienation. But we'd never seen those notebooks. And yes, he'd written a school paper about a man in a black trenchcoat who brutally murders nine students. But we'd never seen that paper. (Although it had alarmed his English teacher enough to bring it to our attention, when we asked to see the paper at a parent-teacher conference, she didn't have it with her. Nor did she describe the contents beyond calling them "disturbing." At the conference—where we discussed many things, including books in the curriculum, Gen X versus Gen Y learners, and the '60s folk song "Four Strong Winds"—we agreed that she would show the paper to Dylan's guidance counselor; if he thought it was a problem, one of them would contact me. I never heard from them.) We didn't see the paper, or Dylan's other writings, until the police showed them to us six months after the tragedy.
In the weeks and months that followed the killings, I was nearly insane with sorrow for the suffering my son had caused, and with grief for the child I had lost. Much of the time, I felt that I could not breathe, and I often wished that I would die. I got lost while driving. When I returned to work part-time in late May, I'd sit through meetings without the slightest idea of what was being said. Entire conversations slipped from memory. I cried at inappropriate times, embarrassing those around me. Once, I saw a dead pigeon in a parking lot and nearly became hysterical. I mistrusted everything—especially my own judgment.


Seeing pictures of the devastation and the weeping survivors was more than I could bear. I avoided all news coverage in order to function. I was obsessed with thoughts of the innocent children and the teacher who suffered because of Dylan's cruelty. I grieved for the other families, even though we had never met. Some had lost loved ones, while others were coping with severe, debilitating injuries and psychological trauma. It was impossible to believe that someone I had raised could cause so much suffering. The discovery that it could have been worse—that if their plan had worked, Dylan and Eric would have blown up the whole school—only increased the agony.

But while I perceived myself to be a victim of the tragedy, I didn't have the comfort of being perceived that way by most of the community. I was widely viewed as a perpetrator or at least an accomplice since I was the person who had raised a "monster." In one newspaper survey, 83 percent of respondents said that the parents' failure to teach Dylan and Eric proper values played a major part in the Columbine killings. If I turned on the radio, I heard angry voices condemning us for Dylan's actions. Our elected officials stated publicly that bad parenting was the cause of the massacre.


Through all of this, I felt extreme humiliation. For months I refused to use my last name in public. I avoided eye contact when I walked. Dylan was a product of my life's work, but his final actions implied that he had never been taught the fundamentals of right and wrong. There was no way to atone for my son's behavior.


Those of us who cared for Dylan felt responsible for his death. We thought, "If I had been a better (mother, father, brother, friend, aunt, uncle, cousin), I would have known this was coming." We perceived his actions to be our failure. I tried to identify a pivotal event in his upbringing that could account for his anger. Had I been too strict? Not strict enough? Had I pushed too hard, or not hard enough? In the days before he died, I had hugged him and told him how much I loved him. I held his scratchy face between my palms and told him that he was a wonderful person and that I was proud of him. Had he felt pressured by this? Did he feel that he could not live up to my expectations?


I longed to talk to Dylan one last time and ask him what he had been thinking. I spoke to him in my thoughts and prayed for understanding. I concluded that he must not have loved me, because love would have prevented him from doing what he did. And though at moments I was angry with him, mostly I thought that I was the one who needed his forgiveness because I'd failed to see that he needed help.

Since the tragedy, I have been through many hours of therapy. I have enjoyed the devotion and kindness of friends, neighbors, coworkers, family members, and strangers. I also received an unexpected blessing. On a few occasions I was contacted by the parents of some of the children killed at the school. These courageous individuals asked to meet privately so we could talk. Their compassion helped me survive.
Still, Dylan's participation in the massacre was impossible for me to accept until I began to connect it to his own death. Once I saw his journals, it was clear to me that Dylan entered the school with the intention of dying there. And so, in order to understand what he might have been thinking, I started to learn all I could about suicide.


Suicide is the end result of a complex mix of pathology, character, and circumstance that produces severe emotional distress. This distress is so great that it impairs one's ability to think and act rationally. From the writings Dylan left behind, criminal psychologists have concluded that he was depressed and suicidal. When I first saw copied pages of these writings, they broke my heart. I'd had no inkling of the battle Dylan was waging in his mind. As early as two years before the shootings, he wrote about ending his life. In one poem, he wrote, "Revenge is sorrow / death is a reprieve / life is a punishment / others' achievements are tormentations / people are alike / I am different." He wrote about his longing for love and his near obsession with a girl who apparently did not know he existed. He wrote, "Earth, humanity, HERE. that's mostly what I think about. I hate it. I want to be free…free… I thought it would have been time by now. the pain multiplies infinitely. Never stops. (yet?) i'm here, STILL alone, still in pain…."


Among the items police found in his room were two half-empty bottles of Saint-John's-wort, an herb believed to elevate mood and combat mild depression. I asked one of Dylan's friends if he knew that Dylan had been taking it. Dylan told him he hoped it would increase his "motivation."


Each year there are approximately 33,000 suicides in the United States. (In Colorado, suicide is the second leading cause of death for people ages 15 to 34.) And it is estimated that 1 to 2 percent of suicides involve the killing of an additional person or people. I will never know why Dylan was part of that small percentage. I will never be able to explain or excuse what he did. No humiliating experience at school could justify such a disproportionate reaction. Nor can I say how powerfully he was influenced by a friend. I don't know how much control he had over his choices at the time of his death, what factors pushed him to commit murder, and why he did not end his pain alone. In talking with other suicide survivors and attempters, however, I think I have some idea why he didn't ask for help.


I believe that Dylan did not want to talk about his thoughts because he was ashamed of having them. He was accustomed to handling his own problems, and he perceived his inability to do so as a weakness. People considering suicide sometimes feel that the world would be better off without them, and their reasons for wanting to die make sense to them. They are too ill to see the irrationality of their thinking. I believe it frightened Dylan to encounter something he did not know how to manage, since he had always taken pride in his self-reliance. I believe he tried to push his negative thoughts away, not realizing that bringing them out in the open was a way to conquer them.

In raising Dylan, I taught him how to protect himself from a host of dangers: lightning, snake bites, head injuries, skin cancer, smoking, drinking, sexually transmitted diseases, drug addiction, reckless driving, even carbon monoxide poisoning. It never occurred to me that the gravest danger—to him and, as it turned out, to so many others—might come from within. Most of us do not see suicidal thinking as the health threat that it is. We are not trained to identify it in others, to help others appropriately, or to respond in a healthy way if we have these feelings ourselves.


In loving memory of Dylan, I support suicide research and encourage responsible prevention and awareness practices as well as support for survivors. I hope that someday everyone will recognize the warning signs of suicide—including feelings of hopelessness, withdrawal, pessimism, and other signs of serious depression—as easily as we recognize the warning signs of cancer. I hope we will get over our fear of talking about suicide. I hope we will teach our children that most suicidal teens telegraph their intentions to their friends, whether through verbal statements, notes, or a preoccupation with death. I hope we come to understand the link between suicidal behavior and violent behavior, and realize that dealing with the former may help us prevent the latter. (According to the U.S. Secret Service Safe School Initiative, 78 percent of school attackers have a history of suicide attempts or suicidal thoughts.) But we must remember that warning signs may not always tell the story. No one saw that Dylan was depressed. He did not speak of death, give away possessions, or say that the world would be better off without him. And we should also remember that even if someone is exhibiting signs of suicide risk, it may not always be possible to prevent tragedy. Some who commit suicide or murder-suicide are—like Eric Harris—already receiving psychiatric care.


If my research has taught me one thing, it's this: Anyone can be touched by suicide. But for those who are feeling suicidal or who have lost someone to suicide, help is available—through resources provided by nonprofits like the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention , and the American Association of Suicidology . (If you are having persistent thoughts about suicide, call the national suicide prevention lifeline at 800-273-8255 to speak with a counselor. And if you are dealing with the loss of a loved one to suicide, know that National Survivors of Suicide Day is November 21, with more than 150 conferences scheduled across the United States and around the world.)
For the rest of my life, I will be haunted by the horror and anguish Dylan caused. I cannot look at a child in a grocery store or on the street without thinking about how my son's schoolmates spent the last moments of their lives. Dylan changed everything I believed about my self, about God, about family, and about love. I think I believed that if I loved someone as deeply as I loved him, I would know if he were in trouble. My maternal instincts would keep him safe. But I didn't know. And my instincts weren't enough. And the fact that I never saw tragedy coming is still almost inconceivable to me. I only hope my story can help those who can still be helped. I hope that, by reading of my experience, someone will see what I missed.

Published by Oprah on October 13, 2009

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A reason of my rant this week on Facebook. We, that work in the free press (free by liberty and cash[unfortunately but for the love of the art]), have to respect this out of our sweat and love.

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Practically, we are free to redistribute, copy and use for any goals nay article, BUT IT IS IMPERATIVE GIVE CREDIT TO THE SOURCE!

My 25 Cents

Gee-Zus

Tuesday, November 2, 2010

A High School Investigation Report

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Looking for old stuff just to feed my nostalgic needs (who hasn’t had the need?!) I found a old report that I made on High School of an exercise of making “investigation”. And of course, was made based on rock and guitars, the report is really inaccurate (of course, I just did it for the sake of a “A”). Just wanted to share. Hard copy at the end of this blog.

Razon e Hipotesis del Trabajo


     Este trabajo se hizo con el proposito de orientar al lector, quien esta interesado en el contenido de este trabajo y encontrara muy informativo este informe que se realiza en Abril de el 2004.
Este trabajo trata una breve historia de el genero de la musica “Rock” y de la aparición de la guitarra electrica. Con esto, deseo investigar si el “Rock” de verdad fué influenciado por la guitarra electrica en los años 50. Tambien una breve comparación entre marcas famosas de guitarras.
  
Historia de el genero “Rock”

     En el 1954 es el año en donde se cree que se origina el Rock. Autores de estos analisis quieren describirlo como un fenómeno popular pasajero y que no se iba a quedar con la gente y estaria sin cultura. Pero como van las cosas hoy en dia, en lo ultimo se equivocan. Se origina en una sociedad en tiempos de recuperación y transformación debido a dos guerras mundiales en donde ya nadie era tan “buen chico” y muchos jovenes se quedaron sin padres debido a que estos sirvieron en la guerra mientras ellos seguian en la escuela. La Filosofia de aquellos tiempos que trataban de contestar preguntas como: “¿Quién soy?”, “¿De donde vengo?”, “¿A dónde voy?”, etc. Tuvieron tambien en que ver en las influencias. Estos ideales y pensamientos surgen luego de la amenaza nuclear.

     Según la enciclopedia SALVAT, el rock es una evolución de adentro de el Pop, cual es el elemento a la nueva evolución cultural o conocida como la contra-cultura. Los jovenes en los 50 empezaron a experimentar gustos y costumbres diferentes a los de sus padres y el de afrontar la realidad de tener que sobrevirir solos en el mundo debido ya que sus padres (La mayoria) murieron en la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Mas la fusiones de cuatro elementos hizo el resultado de originar el Rock, cual son:
1)   El tipico Folklore americano de el Jazz y el Folk
2)   El sonar de los metales con el baile nativo “Tab”
3)   El cambio de actitud y comportamiento de los jovenes para romper la monotomia de data desde los años 20
4)   La mezcla de el blues a los otros elementos pero no tuvo gran auge en sus primeros dias ya que era considerado musica de negros.

     Antes de el triste evento de Pearl Harbor en Hawai en Diciembre de el 1941, en Estados Unidos todos los desempleados fueron reclutados juntos a sus instrumentos musicales para tocar Jazz y entretener a los otros soldados. Despues de la guerra, la población se disminuyo y la economia mejoró lo que llego a la conclusión de que la guerra era provechosa y la gente pudo hacer lo que les diera en gana, incluyendo a musicos osiosos.  Un ejemplo seria Bill Haley quien graba su primera grabación utilizando ritmos combinados en 1954 en el cual consigue fanaticada rapidamente. De ahi nace el Rock & Roll. Desde ahí lo siguen:
1)   James Dean – estrella de la pelicula Rebel without a cause
2)   Rock Around The Clock
3)   Elvis Presley – El mas querido y mas carismatico de todos aunque su mas grande enfoque fue el cine, Presley fue el primero en llevar el rock al otro lado del Atlantico
4)   Probando que el Rock habia llegado a Gran Bretaña, Los Beattles aparecen en America.
5)   Tony Sheridan – origina el Twist en 1961
6)   El quinteto “The Rolling Stones” debutan en 1962
7)   Aparecen los discos de Vinilos
8)   James Brown introduce el uso continuo de el beat y el sintentizador
9)   The Who – intepretan “Summer Times Blue” de Eddie Cochrain
10)                Ritchie Valens – Decendientes de Mejicanos y nacido en Estados Unidos, lleva el Rock a Mexico con la pelicula “La Bamba” en 1986

      En los años 60 surgen los solistas de guitarras en america. Mientras que en Inglaterra surgen diferentes bandas como Los Beattles y Rolling Stones. A la misma vez se creo el concierto de tres dias corridos llamado Woodstock 60 en Woodstock, New York. Fue uno de los grandes momentos de el rock y fue uno de los eventos importantes de el guitarista Jimmy Hendrix, considerado el padre de el Hard-Rock, quien desafortunadamente mas tarde, se suicidaria por depresión.


Evoluciones de el Rock



1)Rock
     -Pioneros:
a)    Bill Haley
b)   Elvis Presley


2)Soft-Rock
     -Pioneros:
a)    Beattles
b)   Rolling Stones


3)Hard-Rock
       -Pioneros:
a)    Jimmy Hendrix
b)   Aerosmith


4)Metal Ingles
         -Pioneros:
a)    Black Sabbath (Ozzy Osbourne)
b)   Motorhead


5)Metal Americano
           -Pioneros:
a)    Megadeth
b)   Metallica

Las Guitarras Eléctricas


     Las guitarras eléctricas aparecieron en el 1950 hecha por ingenieros musicales motivados por la musica y los adelantos de la industrialización y la implantación de el servicio de energia electrica en Estados Unidos. Las cuerdas de las electricas son iguales a la mayoria de las guitarras acusticas, cuerdas de acero. Se componen de una cabezera en donde estan las ruedas para afinar las cuerdas, Cuello con trastes y marcadores de posición, cuerpo, pastillas, boton de volumen. Boton de tono, conector y los populares “Humbuckers” (Dos pastillas unidas). Se supone que las vibraciones de las cuerdas sean captadas por el iman de las pastillas y pasadas al conector que transmitiria desde un cable hacia un amplificador que produce el sonido de las vibraciones. Los destacados en este instrumento musical son: Les Paul, Leo Fender, Lloyd Loar, Adolp Rickenbarker, Wayne Charvel y Grover Jackson.


Marcas:
-Fender
a)    Stratocaster – la mas comun entre las guitarras electricas, diferentes estilos y al proveer tres pastillas, trae diferentes tipos de sonidos lo cual hace que culaquier rockero le de ganas de tener una.
b)   Telecaster- Aunque fue diseñado para el Country (No existia el rock), se experimentó con el y dio buenos resultados entre rockeros.

-Gibson
a)    Les paul - El mas popularentre los musico en general, de muchas versiones, la Standard es la mas popular y el diseño de el propio Gibson de Humbuckers y de selector de sonido o hace diferenciarse de otras marcas.
b)   Flying V – Lanzado en los 50 sin mucha popularidad no abarota en ventas, pero su re-lanzamiento fue un éxito total en 1967 ya que la gente se estaba acostumbrando a lo futurista y su imagen da un buen ejemplo
c)    Explorer – Muy futurista y muy limitado se calcula que se hizieron unas cien unidades y su precio fluctua entre $1,000 y $1,500.

-Rickenbacker
a)    360 – Aunque se destacan mas en bajos, tienen su linea de guitaras con una apariencia poco comun para aquellos tiempos, hoy dia continua con la misma apariencia
b)   360/12 – La misma 360 pero en su version 12 cuerdas

-Charvel-Jackson
a)    RR3 – Una guitarra V muy popular ya que es una de las tantas especificaciones de el solista de Heavy Metal mas famosos de todos los tiempos Randy Roads
b)   JS1 – Una de las guitarras economicas de Jackson, su cuerpo es comun pero para Hard Rock es buena elección ya que tiene doble Humbucker.

Conclusión


Aunque aprendi mucho de este genero y de este instrumento ya que son las dos cosas que quiero tanto ya que siento que es una musica en donde un se expresa sentimientos, inquietudes, malestares, temas libres, etc. Aunque tiene esa estupida fama de que solo por sonar fuerte y no muy comun entre algunas personas, se acusa de usarse de cómo herramienta satanica. Aunque es cierto que existen tales bandas, creo que eso no es la gran mayoria de rockeros ya que existen bandas cristianas y comprueban que la gente se deja llevar por las distorsiones fuertes. Pero contestando mi hipotesis descubri que no. Aunque yo creia tambien que la guitarra electrica llevo a la creción de el rock, aun asi sus origenes no son lejos en tiempo, osea, no es decir que salieron a la misma vez pero si se puede decir que una salio mas o menos despues de otro. La guitarra elctrica ya existia antes de la revolución de el rock y lo descubrí al fijarme en la lectura. Disfrute haciendo este trabajo como forma de expresar sobre mi musica.


Bibliografia

-Internet

-Texto
      a) Enciclopedia SALVAT, Volume “S”
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Here it is the hard copy. Check the blog page if you are not seeing from Facebook.

High School Report -